Kellie-Reflection

November 28, 2012 § Leave a comment

I’ve been reading “We Are Here.” It’s been really enlightening so far. What I have read so far has discussed how anti-Semitism persisted among Germans, manifesting itself in beliefs that Jews were criminals. They received goods that Germans could not receive. Germans were also sometimes displaced when homes for Displaced Persons (of whom Jews were a small minority) were needed. Jews were in a new position in Germany. It became a strange situation where Munich was even described as a safe haven for Jews and that Jews were taking an inappropriate advantage over Germans. I read another book “München: 1945 bis heute Chronik eiens Aufstiegs,” which documents the post-war experience of Munich until when the book was published, which was 1970. It describes how the basic necessities were still in very short supply into the late 1940s and the city was in ruins. The position of Jews must have created an immense tension, as they must have been seen as benefiting  while Germans continued to suffer. 

“We are Here” also describes the difficulties in identity faced by Jews as they were in Displaced Persons camps. Were they the nationality from their home country? Stateless? Transients on their way to Palestine or the United States?  I’m considering looking how Jews justified their existence in Germany after the end of the DP camps, to Jews, Germans, Zionists, and the rest of the world. It would be interesting to see if their were any intellectuals that attempted to answer this question, especially how they answered the question of Zionism. 

This class has made me realize all of the different ways I can answer a question, especially through different types of resources. I feel like I’m definitely more prepared to tackle resources and where I can look to find resources. Despite my continued confusion over my thesis, this class really helped to generate my thinking and to keep me thinking about topics. 

 

Research, Kellie

November 13, 2012 § Leave a comment

For me, this class has been so helpful in discovering some many different resources. I wish I knew about all of these things 3 years ago! Would have been super helpful with all my papers. But I’m really looking forward to using them for my thesis. Though I’m not sure what I want to do exactly in the future, whether it be directly involved with academic historical research or perhaps research current foreign affairs and events, this will certainly all come in handy. 

As for this week, I checked out a couple more books, including one called “We are Here:” New Approaches to Jewish Displaced Persons in Postwar Germany. I’m thinking about taking an intellectual history approach to the topic of the rebuilding of Jewish life in post-war Germany. There must have been intellectual arguments for and against it. But I will need to look further into it. 

Film and Special Collections, Kellie

November 6, 2012 § Leave a comment

So, I decided last week to completely change my project. I realized that I wasn’t that interested in my topic. I was reading the same thing that I already knew existed. I talked to one of my professors last week and I think that I’m going to focus on the re-building of Jewish life in Munich after the war, specifically after the Displaced Persons camps were closed. So, I’m starting over again!

In relation to that, I visited the Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and LIfe. Their archives are closed currently but they will re-open in the spring. It will be interesting to see if I can incorporate some visual sources into my research. 

I haven’t watched it, maybe I can sneak it in before class tomorrow, but I found a documentary called “Journey to Justice,” in the MRC about one Jew’s return to Germany as an American soldier and his work as a translator during the Nuremberg trials. The documentary itself does not sound that relevant to me. However, it includes a short feature that he shoot in 1947 called “Munich: Capital of Bavaria.” Hopefully, this will provide me with some information.

Kellie Hall-Visual Resources and more microfiche

October 30, 2012 § Leave a comment

 searched through the Hoover Institution’s Political Poster collection. I found so many interesting things. In  East Germany, the parties said they should be voted for because they were anti-fascist and the Nazi criminals needed to be eliminated. Also, there is a stronger anti-American sentiment. However, in the West, the parties often advocated for rebuilding and a relationship with the US. Also, they are more likely to indicate that they are anti-communist as a reason for why they should win. There is also indications that the job of denazification is somehow completed. I also found some posters by the US military government warning about food rationing and curfews. ImageA little hard to see but this poster says “For the happiness of our children. That’s why Ami (American) go home!

Image“1918: The Kaiser left and the war criminals stayed. 1945/1946 Hitler left and and the war criminals will be taken out of power and our people votes on June 30th with YES! With that there will finally be peace” 

Image“Safety/security from socialist experiments. That’s why CDU”

I also went back to the microfiche library this week. I read some documents about the military government’s education policy right after the war. They have very broad and extensive goals. They sought to re-educate all teachers, re-organize universities, and establish new curriculum. There is also an emphasis on returning the schools to Germans as quickly as possible and for Germans to set the curriculum of the schools. I also read about their concerns about a bias towards Marx-Leninist education in the Soviet Union. What is really interesting about these documents is the scale of these operations. Of course they had American soldiers helping but the staff was incredibly small. For all of Bavaris in June 1947, they had only a staff of 31. It would be interesting how these goals were carried out with such a small staff or who they might have employed to help them. 

Matt’s Topic

October 23, 2012 § Leave a comment

I decided to research Matt’s question. I tried to look through the Preussischer Kulturbesitz to see if there was anything. I did find one painting.  I did have to search in German to find it, though the archive does have some sources in English as well as in other languages. The painting says Hessian  Soldiers, that that were sold from their sovereign, Friedrich II, as mercenaries to England, are shipped to America.  Doesn’t tell you too much.

 

There was also in the microfiche/microform a report about the state of the troops, British and German, under the command of General Sir William Howe, encamped at Philadelphia , Dec. 14 1777. It is in the early American imprints. There was also another source in the microfiche called “A List of the general and staff officers in the several British, foreign, and provincial regiments, serving in North America, under the command  of His Excellency, General Sir Henry Clinton, K.B: With the dates of their commissions as they rank in each corps and in the army. I found these sources under the subject title: Hessian mercenaries-Registers.

 

I found one source online through oskicat. It’s from the Archive of Americana. It speaks of the concern of Americans about the behavior of Hessians towards American women. One man speaks of how a mercenary came into their house and tried to rape his daughter. It also speaks of property damage. The link is below.

http://infoweb.newsbank.com/iw-search/we/Evans/?p_product=EAIX&p_theme=eai&p_nbid=K6EL61QWMTM1MTAzMzE0Ny41NTMwOTA6MToxNDoxNjkuMjI5LjMyLjEzNg&p_action=doc&p_queryname=1&p_docref=v2:0F2B1FCB879B099B@EAIX-0F2F82FADFB7A100@15037-@1

Microfiche

October 16, 2012 § 2 Comments

 honestly was really busy this week but I did make it down to the microfilm library. I found some microfiche (which has a really good guide) that relates to the US Occupation of Germany. It appears to not just just be congressional hearings but also just a variety documents and correspondence relating to educational reform. 

I actually had a really hard time with the microfiche. It was really difficult to maneuver and I really didn’t have time to ask a librarian for help. I had looked up in the guide about how the US handled communism in the curriculum of German schools. I found quite a few things but I really spent most of my time trying to figure out how to move the fiche. I didn’t really end up finding what I was looking for. When I’m less busy, I plan on going back and asking for some help.

What was interesting was just to see how invasive the US was in the planning of school curriculum. I need to do further research on this but it appears that the US set up at the federal level in Germany an organization that approved the curriculum for all schools. I find it very interesting that they choose to do so in Germany but not in the US.

It also relates do another source from the Konferenz der Kultusminister der Länder, which still sets the curriculum for German schools. In 1962, it released “Richtlinien für die Behandlung des Totalitarismus im Unterricht,” In 1962, the Kultusministerkonferenz released the “Richtlinien für die Behandlung des Totalitarismus im Unterricht,” (Guidelines for the handling of totalitarianism in classrooms) which states that teachers must teach their students of the criminal objectives of National Socialism and of communism.  They also needed to remember the close “Verwandtschaft”  (relationship) of Nazism and communism.  In these guidelines, all events to be taught after the Second World War about Bolshevism are under the heading “Der Bolshewismus als Weltmacht.” (Bolshevism as a World power) These include the “Bolschewisierung Chinas” (Bolshevization of China) and the “Überfall auf Südkorea.” (Defeat of South Korea) It is also characterized always as a threat. The expulsions were also to be taught as part of the “Machtausbreitung des Bolschewismus.” (The power expansion of Bolshevism) These guidelines for teaching therefore sought to connect Nazism and communism as a single ideology and sought to characterize the expulsions not as a result of Hitler’s policies but as part of a Bolshevist plan to expand their power.

I’m starting to thinking about how the US used school curriculums as an integrative force for those new Germany (especially expellees) and as a way of demonizing communism. 

 honestly was really busy this week but I did make it down to the microfilm library. I found some microfiche (which has a really good guide) that relates to the US Occupation of Germany. It appears to not just just be congressional hearings but also just a variety documents and correspondence relating to educational reform. 

I actually had a really hard time with the microfiche. It was really difficult to maneuver and I really didn’t have time to ask a librarian for help. I had looked up in the guide about how the US handled communism in the curriculum of German schools. I found quite a few things but I really spent most of my time trying to figure out how to move the fiche. I didn’t really end up finding what I was looking for. When I’m less busy, I plan on going back and asking for some help.

What was interesting was just to see how invasive the US was in the planning of school curriculum. I need to do further research on this but it appears that the US set up at the federal level in Germany an organization that approved the curriculum for all schools. I find it very interesting that they choose to do so in Germany but not in the US.

It also relates do another source from the Konferenz der Kultusminister der Länder, which still sets the curriculum for German schools. In 1962, it released “Richtlinien für die Behandlung des Totalitarismus im Unterricht,” In 1962, the Kultusministerkonferenz released the “Richtlinien für die Behandlung des Totalitarismus im Unterricht,” (Guidelines for the handling of totalitarianism in classrooms) which states that teachers must teach their students of the criminal objectives of National Socialism and of communism.  They also needed to remember the close “Verwandtschaft”  (relationship) of Nazism and communism.  In these guidelines, all events to be taught after the Second World War about Bolshevism are under the heading “Der Bolshewismus als Weltmacht.” (Bolshevism as a World power) These include the “Bolschewisierung Chinas” (Bolshevization of China) and the “Überfall auf Südkorea.” (Defeat of South Korea) It is also characterized always as a threat. The expulsions were also to be taught as part of the “Machtausbreitung des Bolschewismus.” (The power expansion of Bolshevism) These guidelines for teaching therefore sought to connect Nazism and communism as a single ideology and sought to characterize the expulsions not as a result of Hitler’s policies but as part of a Bolshevist plan to expand their power.

I’m starting to thinking about how the US used school curriculums as an integrative force for those new Germany (especially expellees) and as a way of demonizing communism. 

Question

October 11, 2012 § 1 Comment

Sorry to put this up here but I forgot to ask today. Does anyone happen to know a professor who is interested in American/ European, specifically German relations after WWII? I need some advice for books and such. Thanks!